Loneliest Road

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It’s been called The Loneliest Road, which ironically gave it fame and tourism otherwise unsolicited or deserved.  Route 50 cuts across Nevada from East to West, with nary a stop along the way.  It’s sole purpose to get from one end to the other… CA being on the West end, Utah being on the East.

Our destination was to cut across Northern CA to Great Basin National Park, on the Eastern edge of Nevada.  This time of year we were the only ones at Great Basin National Park, as the Park itself and all the roads, overlooks, and scenic drives were closed (unlike what their own website indicated).  One year round campground was open, so at least we had that.

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With snow on the ground, the temperatures were quite nippy.  It did provide for our first glimpse of a white turkey, though… so that was pretty cool.

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Lehman Caves was open, and provided a wonderful excursion and scenic site.   You can check out my photos of the Caves here….Lehman Caves

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We will have to imagine the park and it’s views since it wasn’t open when we were there.  But I can tell you that the babbling brook and creek running as the snow melted was very calming and serene.  The views of the snow packed peaked above us, surrounded by aspen and birch were stunning to behold.

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I can’t say it’s worth the drive, having seen so little of it… but it was a nice place to rest our head for the night.

 

 

 

 

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2 Comments

  1. […] Lehman Caves, on the Eastern Edge of Nevada, are just outside of Great Basin National Park, not far from Zion National Park in Utah.  They were discovered by Absalom Lehman in 1885.  For us, our trip was not much more than a byway toward our home in AZ.  We thought we would check out Great Basin National Park, which unfortunately, despite their website saying it was open, was closed.  So the Caves ‘saved the day’ giving us a highlight we had not anticipated.  You can see my limited photos of Great Basin National Park here. […]

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