Snow Burn

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My sister tells me she enjoys my blog and hasn’t seen a post in awhile… so I guess I have been remise.¬† Hi, Karen ūüôā

So we went out to our burn area behind our house to take some photos of the burn area in the recent snow fall.

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Our singed trees are loving the snow and the soaking water it yields.¬† While many trees won’t come back… some will.

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We’ve gotten probably 24″ since Christmas all together, so it has been very welcome precipitation for our forest.¬† The snow has slowly melted in, giving the ground it’s much needed moisture.¬† We’ll take all we can get.¬† Bring it on.. and bring more!

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A Whoosh and a Tale

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We got about 8 inches of snow out of this last storm.  I am loving the beautiful fresh fallen snow on the trees.. and this sweet deer taking it all in.

Then… in a Whoosh, 1/100th of a second later, to be exact.¬† From right behind the tree came quite a surprise to me… and this lucky deer.

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OMG!  What the HECK was THAT?!?!

In a flash, this mountain lion thought he had dinner.   But in just a matter of minutes, he was back empty-pawed.

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Dejected and hungry, he left the scene of the near miss, not to be seen again.

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The deer have since been back… but are a lot more cautious and alert.

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It was the first mountain lion I have EVER seen in the wild.¬† I felt so fortunate to get a shot of it.¬† As it was… I was looking through my viewfinder when it happened…. and it was over in less than a blink of an eye.¬† Life happens quickly, it pays to know your path and be prepared.

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More Best of 2018

I did a Best of. 2018 here….¬† ¬†¬†https://kritterspix.com/2018/12/27/best-of-2018/

I’m fortunate to have taken enough worthy photos that I can share multiple Best of 2018 posts, albeit some similar themes.

ts snohort2_IR.jpg1.  Tree Saddle Snow    First Snow of 2018, January 21 on Mogollon Rim.

vsm st hirt_IR.jpg2.  Blue Shutters    Provence FRANCE

v waterrok_IR_IR.jpg3.  Water Rok    Vernazza, Cinque Terre  ITALY

riostripvill_IR_IR.jpg4. Rio Boats    Riomaggiore, Cinque Terre ITALY

_40A0799_IR.jpg5.  Fog Trees    Fog over Moqui Draw

pt imp river_IR.jpg6. Point Imperial River    Sunset over Grand Canyon North Rim, Point Imperial

D_Smathia_Grand_Canyon_NR_0918 copy_IR.jpg7.¬† Awesome View¬† ¬† Your’s truly, taken at North Rim Grand Canyon by Arizona Highways Photographer, Suzanne Mathia

cp flwrs hort_IR_IR.jpg8.  Cape Flowers    Grand Canyon North Rim, Cape Royal

AspenMaple_IR.jpg9.  Aspen Maple    Fall Colors on Mogollon Rim

_40A4032_IR.jpg10. Ruins Burst    Sunrise of old Indian Ruins

I love these posts.  They make me reflect on the year past, where I have been and what we have done.  These images are a glimpse into our lives and our souls.  I hope you enjoyed taking the journey with me.

For more pix check out…¬†¬†https://kritterspix.com/2018/12/27/best-of-animals-2018/¬† ¬† and¬†¬†https://kritterspix.com/2018/12/27/best-of-2018/.

 

Stained Glass Door

All good ideas start with a vision.

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It’s not like I seek out things to do.¬† They just come to us, with a need.¬† Well, maybe, need, isn’t the right word.¬† How about… a good idea.

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For instance… we have these doors.¬† They are pretty plain.¬† Wouldn’t they look better with a stained glass window on them.¬† That’s what we thought!

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So I drew up a pattern that seemed suited for our area… you know, elk, bunnies, blue jays, trees.

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And then set out to build it.¬† We have never fretted over the amount of work in any particular project.¬† I suppose if we did, we’d never get anything done.¬† We just think of the finished project, and how cool it might be… and set out to accomplish it.

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Once the pattern was finished, I set out to choose the colors… and cut the glass for the 6′ tall door.

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And cut glass….

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Then I began the daunting task of a combination of leading and foiling the glass pieces in a long labor intensive effort that took patience, determination and perseverance.

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Then after soldering all the joints, I had to ‘pack’ the lead channel with a DAP window caulking.

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Then use a gypsum powder to clean the flux off the solder joints and lead channel.

 

I actually made my husband a bet… I expected the project to take a year, he gave me 8 months.¬† Working long consecutive days at every opportunity I had available to me, I finished it in 6 months.

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Now our door isn’t plain any more.¬† Who knew we needed a stained glass door… but it was a good idea.

 

A Special Place

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Do you have a special place?

Maybe a restaurant you meet your one and only?  A place of solitude that elicits fond memories?  A spot you go to so that you might clear your head?

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We should all have such a place of tranquility and peaceful reconciliation.¬† Alas, many of the restaurant / bars that my husband and I remember fondly – where we met, where we danced to quiet music, etc.¬† – are now no longer there.¬† And I’m not talking just change in names… buildings gone, and unrecognizably landscapes have taken the place of long forgotten icons.

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But we still have our special place.¬† It’s not a restaurant or a bar… it’s an attitude of peaceful reflection.¬† My husband first went when he was a boy of 10 years old.¬† He went camping with his dad.¬† His dad felt he should know how to drive in case anything happened to him.¬† So it’s a place, he first learned to drive with his dad – gone now some 20 years.

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My husband took me there before we were married, some 30+ years ago now.¬† It was then that we discovered these ruins as we looked over this grand landscape and saw this structure tucked into the side of the hill… seemingly undiscovered all these years.

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We have been going back ever since, and deem it our special place.  It is magical, tranquil, and awe-inspiring.  We should all have such a special place.

 

 

Bison are back

_40A3761_IR.jpgBison at North Rim, Grand Canyon

Back in the mid to late 1800’s over 60 million bison roamed the plains.¬† From North Dakota to Arizona herds were plentiful and prolific.

bison54_IR.jpgBison at Raymond Wilderness Area

Until they weren’t.¬† Hunters decimated much of the herds.¬† In fact, it was in large part ‘how the West was won’, as hunters kill Native American Indian’s food source.¬† With only some 23 bison left, concerned citizens the likes of Theodore Roosevelt and the Bronx Zoo, among others isolated the remaining bison to prohibit their extinction.

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Today, bison are being re-introduced and bred under the watchful eye of Game and Fish Departments, National Wildlife Federation, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and private organizations across the country.¬† Today’s bison are carefully monitored for disease and genealogy to assure healthy, robust, diverse herds.

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It’s a real treat to see them grazing on the Plains and to appreciate and observe these large historic animals.

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For more bison pix, see my post here …¬†https://kritterspix.com/2018/11/05/they-are-not-buffalo/

Ring Tale

We have explored the backroads of Arizona extensively.¬† Along our travels we have been fortunate enough to see all sorts of amazing scenery, and wonderful animal sightings.¬† I always feel blessed to have these great animals cross our paths at the same time they cross ours.¬† Some animals are common to see, elk and deer for instance.¬† Others, not so much, but we have seen… bobcat, turkey, and even bear.

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On a recent trip to Sedona we saw this elusive little critter practically under our feet.¬† We spot lighted him with our flashlight and caught a fleeting shot.¬† It’s a ringtail cat!

Apparently, it’s the Official State Mammal of Arizona (who knew?).¬† They have a fox-like face with pointed ears and a long distinctive tail.¬† The ringtail is part of the raccoon family… note, the familiar striped tail.¬† They live in a riparian habitat in the rocks near water, making Sedona a prime area (apparently).¬† They are noctural creatures, only coming out at night.¬† So, we were lucky to catch of glimpse of him.

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We had been taking night shots at an overlook in Sedona when he scurried across us, curious what we were he came back for a another quick look.  Funny how that happens.  Sometimes it is all about being in the right place at the right time.

See more Sedona pix….¬†https://kritterspix.com/2018/10/30/sedona-az/¬† and¬† ¬†https://kritterspix.com/2018/10/30/oak-creek-sedona-az/