Rock Art Ranch

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Have you heard of this place?

It’s at the courtesy of rancher and owner, Brantley Baird, an old cowboy and a character himself.  He gives tours of a section of land down a canyon which is littered with Indian petroglyphs.  But before you get there listen to the fabulous stories our host has to offer and the artifacts he has found, collected, and been given in his interesting pioneer museum.  It’s like going into a western cowboy past, filled with stagecoaches, furnishings, cowboy hats, indian pots, and farm equipment.  It’s a historic experience and interesting way to spend the day.

The ranch is located East of Winslow, West of St. Josephs City on a large strip of dirt and dust that is still a sometimes cattle ranch.  Brantley Baird gives tours on request by appointment only.

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The grounds house several bunkhouses for weddings, overnights, etc., in addition to the museum and the only remaining bunkhouse from the Hashknife Cowboys.  The Hashknife Cowboy outfit were the cowboy who managed the cattle in northern AZ at the turn of the century.  In the day, the government gave the land to the railroads who then sold it to ranchers.  This last remaining bunkhouse is still intact and outfitted with original bunk beds, allowing one a glimpse in cowboy past.

brant_PSi  It’s a fascinating tour given by a man meticulous about preserving the past, including the treasure trove of petroglyphs that grace his land and are frequented by University types documenting their findings.pots_PSi

Once the museum tour is done, it’s time to make the trek to the canyon.  There Brant has put quite a bit of time, energy, and money making the decent into the canyon safe via railings and walk ways.

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The petroglyphs after you make the decent are everywhere along the walls.  There are pictographs of families, animals, and symbols.  It’s a fascinating display.

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Check out more pix on kritterspix.com.

Harvey Girls

Have you heard of the Harvey Girls? marie story teller_Ssi They are a part of our history.  Back in the late 1800’s when the railroads were growing and people from the East coast were moving West, train stops were pretty rough and uninviting.  Good food was literally road kill, or re-cycled stews (if you didn’t eat it, it went back in the pot).  Fred Harvey had a better idea.  With the railroads help, he built ‘Harvey Houses’ along the railway.  Harvey Houses were at rail stops along the way offering places to stay and decent food with actual linen napkins and white tablecloths.  Men proved unreliable to come to work at the Harvey Houses.  They would get in brawls or liquored up.  So the idea of using women (unheard of in the day) to serve the guests was born, and they were dubbed the Harvey Girls. La Posada, in Winslow, AZ, was an original Harvey House built in 1930. It sits as a train depot for the now BSF train.  It has been refurbished and today operates as a first rate restaurant, hotel, and living museum.  We took the opportunity partake in a unique opportunity and take a Harvey Girls tour. la pos gates_Ssi The Harvey Girls is a group of volunteers committed to preserving the history of La Posada, Fred Harvey, Mary Colter, and the Harvey Girls. marie teller_Ssi Marie, our host, was the daughter of a Harvey Girl, and an entertaining story teller for our fascinating and informative tour.  Not only did we learn more about Harvey Girls and their history than we had previously known… but also got to see a lot of the architectural details of La Posada that we would not have otherwise had the opportunity.  If you’re ever in Winslow… call ahead.  Make an appointment for a Harvey Girls tour… and stay for a historic tour and a fine meal. mike compass_Ssi  lp bar_Ssi